Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) warning issued for Southeast Alaska

June 22 2010

This past week has seen five cases of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in Alaska, including two cases in Southeast Alaska that resulted in the June 17 death of a Juneau woman who ate a cockle and the June 22 death of a Haines man who ate a Dungeness crab. The other three cases were in Kodiak and they resulted in illness from eating butter clams. The two Southeast deaths, if confirmed by autopsy, will be the first paralytic shellfish poisoning deaths in Alaska since 1997. In 2009 there was just one reported case of PSP in Alaska, and there were no cases of PSP in 2008 and one in 2007. There have been periodic outbreaks of PSP over the years, with the most deadly instance coming when clams and mussels gathered from Peril Straits near Sitka killed more than 100 Russians and Aleuts in 1799. According to the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, the 57-year-old Juneau woman reportedly ate cockles she gathered on June 14 from the Point Louisa end of Auke Bay. She died June 17 after being hospitalized at Bartlett Regional Hospital in Juneau. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation tested cockles from Auke Bay after the woman was hospitalized and DEC found the Auke Bay cockles had much higher levels of PSP than acceptable (they should not have more than 80 parts per million, and the cockles had 2,044 parts per million). The 57-year-old Haines man reportedly ate Dungeness crab on June 18 that he caught off Jenkins Rock near the Chilkat Inlet of Lynn Canal. He was hospitalized at Bartlett Regional Hospital on June 18 and released from the hospital on June 21. He died in his Haines home early on June 22. Dungeness crab meat does not contain PSP, but the viscera (guts) can have the toxin, health officials said. People should not eat crab viscera. The Department of Environmental Conservation plans to test crabs from Southeast for PSP. What is paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP)? Paralytic shellfish poisoning, or PSP, is a potentially lethal toxin that can lead to fatal respiratory paralysis, according to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The toxin comes from algae, which is a food source for clams, mussels, crabs and other shellfish found across Alaska. This toxin can be found in shellfish every month of the year, and butter clams have been known to store the toxin for up to two years. The toxin cannot be seen with the naked eye, and there is no simple test a person can do before they harvest. One of the highest concentrations of PSP in the world was reported in shellfish from Southeast Alaska. Symptoms of PSP can begin almost immediately, or they can take several hours after eating the affected shellfish before they appear. Symptoms include shortness of breath, tingling, dizziness and numbness. If you suspect someone has symptoms of PSP, get that person to a medical facility fast (an Alaska Sea Grant link below has first aid for PSP). Death is rare from PSP, but some people have died after eating just one clam or mussel with the PSP toxin, while in other cases it took eating many clams or mussels to get enough of the poison to cause death. Are Southeast beaches safe for subsistence or recreational shellfish harvesting? The Department of Environmental Conservation recommends harvesting of shellfish only from DEC-certified beaches, and the only certified beaches in the state are located in the Cook Inlet and Kachemak Bay areas of Southcentral Alaska. According to DEC, there are no certified beaches in populated areas of Southeast Alaska, Kodiak or the Aleutian Islands. The only beaches DEC can certify as safe for shellfish collecting are those where state-certified testing of clams and mussels is done regularly. “Do not eat shellfish from uncertified beaches,” DEC Program Specialist George Scanlan said. “Anyone who eats PSP-contaminated shellfish is at risk for illness or death.” The DEC warning does not apply to commercially grown and harvested shellfish available in grocery stores and restaurants. Commercially grown and harvested shellfish goes through a regular testing program before it goes to market. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) resources Alaska Department of Health and Social Services fact sheet, http://www.hss.state.ak.us/pdf/201006_shellfish.pdf DEC page about paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and how it works, http://www.dec.state.ak.us/eh/fss/seafood/psp/psp.htm DEC links page with more info about PSP, http://www.dec.state.ak.us/eh/fss/seafood/psphome.htm DEC page about identifying butter clams, littleneck clams and cockles (has photos), http://www.dec.state.ak.us/eh/fss/seafood/psp/shellfish.htm Current DEC warning about PSP in Alaska (dated June 16, 2010), http://dec.alaska.gov/press_releases/2010/2010_06_16_psp%20final.pdf Joint DH&SS/DEC press release about Haines case of PSP (dated June 21, 2010), http://www.hss.state.ak.us/press/2010/Additional_case_of_PSP_reported_062110.pdf Twitter feed for the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, http://twitter.com/alaska_DHSS Alaska Sea Grant page with links about paralytic shellfish poisoning, http://seagrant.uaf.edu/features/PSP/psp_page.html Alaska Sea Grant page with first aid for PSP victims (get victim to medical facility fast), http://seagrant.uaf.edu/features/PSP/PSP_aid.html Centers of Disease Control and Prevention page on marine toxins (including PSP), http://www.cdc.gov/nczved/divisions/dfbmd/diseases/marine_toxins/